FAQ’s For the Vote

1. How much will my property taxes increase if I vote “yes”? Voter approval of the mill levy increase of 6.95 mills will equate to less than $5.00 a month or 15 cents a day (just under $55 a year) per $100,000 of residential actual property value and $202 a year ( 55 cents per day) per $100,000 of commercial actual value.
2. Is the Library writing grants or fundraising to offset the impact on the taxpayers?
Yes, the Library has already been awarded a $1,500,000 DOLA grant and garnered a corporate donation pledge of $10,000 receipt of which is dependent on the passing of the ballot issue. We will continue seeking grants and pledges.
3. What will happen to the current building?
It belongs to the Town and will revert to their management.
4. Why didn’t you buy land on Main Street?
We couldn’t afford it. The land we have is now paid off.
5. Why are you building so much meeting space?
When we conducted a feasibility study in the summer of 2014, you told us that more meeting space was the greatest community need. In October of 2015, as we were finalizing the conceptual design, the library board entreated me to ask the public one more time regarding the larger meeting space. We knew that it was going to be a stretch for the community and that we were building something that was atypically large for a library and wanted to hear from the community one more time. We ran an article in the Norwood Post and had the plans on the website for review and feedback. We received little feedback so I went out asking persons in the community. Of the 17 persons who provided feedback, only one voted for the smaller space. When comparing the size of the smaller proposed meeting space (1250 sq ft) to the Livery (1500 sq ft) or the Town hall (1337 sq ft) it became clear that the smaller space was redundant in the community and the larger space was more practical allowing for more opportunities for the community. The uses for this space are immeasurable both now and in the future.
6. Why does Norwood need a bigger library?
Over the last five years, the library has seen a large increase in usage. A few statistics which stand out are:
1. 38% more people through the door. More and more people are using the library. Despite the availability of online books and resources, we continue to see a rise in visits to the library. (This number does not include offsite program attendance nor attendance at outreach events such as story times at Prime Time).
2. 369% increase in attendance at Children’s programs. In order to accommodate the increased number of participants and to allow the children the room to learn, we have held programs before regular opening hours, held programs outdoors (weather permitting) and have partnered to use spaces like the Livery and the Firehouse. While temporary solutions have gotten us through, increased demand on these spaces makes this an unstable permanent solution. The changing locations, also makes things more confusing for children and parents.
3. 2171% increase in WiFi usage. The high cost of Internet in our area makes it cost prohibitive for many families and individuals to have Internet at home and yet, our society is becoming more and more dependent on being able to access information online. The library gives all community members equal opportunity to access the Internet.
7. Why was the new location selected?
The Land Committee, comprised of Lone Cone Library President, Hartley Bloomfield, and Trustee Jenny Weed, looked at a number of existing buildings and vacant lots in the fall of 2012. At that time, Daniel Tucker reached out to the board and offered his property of approximately 12 acres to us for $75,000. This was much cheaper than anything else that the committee had looked at and something that we knew we could afford. We also like that the property was surrounded on 3 sides by residential neighborhoods, allowing easy access for children and seniors.
8. How big will the new library be?
The new library will be 11,688 sq feet.
9. What will the tax rate question look like on the ballot?
Lone Cone Library District Ballot Issue No. 5C
SHALL LONE CONE LIBRARY DISTRICT TAXES BE INCREASED $ 298,500 ANNUALLY (ESTIMATED REVENUES IN THE YEAR 2017) AND BY WHATEVER ADDITIONAL AMOUNTS ARE RECEIVED THEREAFTER BY INCREASING THE MILL LEVY FROM 3.478 TO 10.428 MILLS FOR THE PURPOSE OF REPLENISHING RESERVES EXPENDED IN RECENT YEARS AND MAINTAINING LIBRARY SERVICES INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO:

SATISFYING CONDITIONS FOR THE RECEIPT OF A $1,500,000.00 MATCHING GRANT APPROVED BY THE STATE OF COLORADO, DIVISION OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT FROM THE ENERGY AND MINERAL IMPACT ASSISTANCE FUND FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF NEW LIBRARY FACILITIES (the “Grant”)

CONSTRUCTING NEW LIBRARY BUILDINGS, GROUNDS AND COMMUNITY GATHERING AND PROGRAMMING SPACES

PROVIDING SPACE FOR LEGAL CLINICS, RESOURCES AND OTHER LEGAL SERVICES IN COOPERATION WITH THE STATE OF COLORADO, DEPARTMENT OF THE JUDICIARY

UPDATING BOOKS, MEDIA, TECHNOLOGY AND RESEARCH MATERIALS;

WORKING WITH PARENTS AND CAREGIVERS TO ENSURE EACH CHILD HAS A STRONG START AND IS KINDERGARTEN READY;

PROVIDING LITERACY BASED PROGRAMMING;

PROVIDING A LINK TO THE OUTSIDE WORLD FOR THE HOME BOUND WHILE BUILDING COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS;

INCREASING SERVICES TO THE AGING POPULATION AND YOUTH;

ENSURING ADEQUATE STAFF;

PROVIDING LIFELONG EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES FOR STUDENTS AND ADULTS;

AND SHALL THE PROCEEDS OF THE TAX LEVY RECEIVED IN 2017 AND THEREAFTER BE COLLECTED AND SPENT REGARDLESS OF THE LIMITATIONS OF SECTION 29-1-301, C.R.S.; AND SHALL ALL REVENUES RECEIVED BY THE DISTRICT FROM SUCH INCREASE BE COLLECTED AND SPENT WITHOUT LIMITATION OR CONDITION, AND WITHOUT AFFECTING THE COLLECTION OR SPENDING OF ANY OTHER REVENUES OR FUNDS (INCLUDING THE PROCEEDS OF THE GRANT) UNDER ARTICLE X, SECTION 20 OF THE COLORADO CONSTITUTION, OR ANY OTHER LAW?

10. How long will the tax increase last?
The library district is asking for an increase of 6.95 mills. 3 mills are for current and projected operating costs. 3.95 mills are for the debt payment. We expect to finance the debt for a 20 year period.
11. Isn’t the current building historic?
Yes, the original Herndon homestead cabin still exists beneath the drywall of the current computer room. This building will not be destroyed and may possibly be used to expand the museum beyond the Log Cabin. All decisions regarding the building will be made by the Town Board once the Library relinquishes its lease.
12. What will the new library have that the current library does not?
 The Children and Teens each have their own space and more programs can be offered.
 Expansion of Adult collections including the Charlie Fowler collection, DVDs and media.
 Small study rooms for tutoring, private meetings or a quiet place to work.
 Simultaneous program offerings.
 A larger meeting room that could be divided into smaller spaces or used as a whole for events, conferences and speakers.
 Space for a Visitor Center which will advertise our region’s many and varied outdoor activities and tourist attractions.
 Space for an Equal Access Center of the Colorado Supreme Court to help community members navigate our legal system by providing reliable and affordable legal information.
 An outdoor amphitheater for performances and events.
 Walking trails and other park-like features.
 Greenhouse space for instruction by CSU extension office or other such groups.
 Expanded access to technology
13. What happens if it doesn’t pass in November?
 Library services will decrease, due to loss of oil and gas taxes, leading to restricted access to information, early literacy and lifelong learning programming, and materials for all.
 The library will have to cut services, materials and staff in the existing location.
 $1,511,000 in provisional grant monies and corporate and individual pledged donations will have to be turned down.
 Increasingly, the determination of what the library can offer and make available to the public will be made by space and decreased staff capacity consideration rather than use or relevancy.
14. What will it look like?
You may have seen conceptual photos of what the building may look like, however, those are conceptual not final architectural renderings. We wanted to show that the exterior of the building will fit
15. Can’t you build a bigger library without raising taxes?
Unfortunately, we cannot. In addition to the $1,500,000 DOLA grant that the library has been awarded, we pledge to raise another half a million in grants and other fundraisers, however, we still need to raise taxes in order to finance the other 50% of the project.
16. We don’t need a new library- we can use Telluride or Naturita’s libraries.
Telluride and Naturita both have fantastic, award-winning libraries, there is no doubt. Yet, if you look at them, they are so much more in their communities than just a storehouse of books and dvds. They are hubs of activity and learning. Norwood needs a similar hub.
17. Can’t you cut the meeting space to make the project cheaper? Can’t you make it smaller so that it will be less expensive?
If we decreased the meeting space and went with one of the plans proposed earlier in the process, the meeting space would likely have been similar in size to the Town Hall or Livery. Norwood did not need a third space of the same size. Plus, time and again, community feedback from our interviews in summer 2014, our community meeting in July, 2014 and the October, 2015 survey; pointed to your need as a community for a larger space to gather and hold events.
18. What’s wrong with the current building?
We have outgrown our current building. Attendance at our programs has grown to beyond what will fit in our space. We do not have any meeting so story time occurs in the magazine reading space. With no office space and only two work stations, staff trip over each other if there are more than two working at a given time and there is no room to process or repair books. We have more children’s books than we can shelve, so we have boxes of them in a storage unit on our land, awaiting the new library. To continue offering the quality service this community expects, we need more space.
19. How does this cost and size compare to other libraries in the area?
Library
Building size
Cost of construction
Date of construction
How size meets need of community- eg Still growing into it? Just right? Getting tight? Outgrown?
Dolores
6900
$900,000
2004
Getting tight-need more rooms for meeting space and space for teens
Mancos
7500
$1,680,000
Completed 6/30/2009
Would have planned for more meeting space (esp. small study rooms) and storage space. Also, would have had acoustic ceilings vs. wooden vaulted ceilings to help mitigate echo & sound “pollution”.
Naturita

4400 sq. ft.
$1.2M
2009
Just right.
Ouray
1600
unknown
1950s
not at all, looking to renovate and expand
Ridgway
4600

Telluride
20,000 square feet
In 1997 voters approved $8.987million bond – the land was $1.6 million
2000
“We are currently renovating to improve the space to accommodate changing use and a need to address quiet study, teens and meeting space.” We feel it is becoming tight, but are hoping that a thoughtful renovation can provide us with more efficient use of the existing space.
20. How does this plan address future growth?
Unless Norwood experiences a boom in population, we expect this building to meet our needs for at least the next 20 years.
21. How come I don’t see any green features on the floor plans?
In order to receive DOLA funds, we are required to build in green/energy efficient features. These will be included when an architect creates the build documents. What we have now are only conceptual.
22. Are these drawings and floor plans final?
These are conceptual designs. The floor plan will likely stay very close to what we currently have but the building may or may not end up looking very similar to the drawings. We are committed to an appearance that will fit well in this community.
23. When would the new building be open?
We expect the building would open in late summer or fall of 2018.
24. Are you going to charge a fee to use the meeting rooms, study rooms and classes?
We will create similar policies to other meeting spaces in town.
25. Will this building require additional staff?
The floor plan was designed so that it could be managed by only 2 staff at a time which is what we run currently. The library has 9 persons on staff, the new building would allow for more staff to work at the same time versus our current building which only has space for 2.
26. Why now?
Our current space is at capacity and we cannot maintain this level of service in the space for much longer. Also, as of next year, DOLA will not be awarding grants as large as the one they have awarded us this year. This would mean more of the burden would fall on the taxpayers.
27. Is there an identified need in the community for the meeting spaces to be included?
Larger meeting space is needed for events like: Harvest Dinner, Library Luncheon, 4H awards banquets, wedding receptions, family reunions, prom, educational programs,
28. The orientation of the building does not feel neighborhood friendly. Shouldn’t the building be facing Pinion/ San Miguel Street with the parking in the back?
This can be looked at prior to final documents being created but the narrowness of the lot limits the dimensions and orientation of the building somewhat.
29. Lone Cone Library doesn’t have all the books that I want, but Telluride does. Why can’t we have them? Is the problem room? Or money?
The reason could be both space and money; however, it might just be because no one has expressed interest in that topic before. We try to be extremely responsive in purchasing requested titles but we do not have the money or the space to buy every great book just in case it will be wanted. We welcome your suggestions!
30. Who is eligible to vote for the new library?
Any registered voter who lives in the San Miguel portion of the Norwood School District is eligible to vote in the Library District.
31. What is the current library square footage for adult/children’s materials and what is the square footage for those in the proposed building?
See below

Space Program Comparison

Norwood Lone Cone Public Library

CATEGORY / SPACE NAME
EXISTING LIBRARY
SUBTOTAL
NEW LIBRARY
SUBTOTAL
VARIANCE
LIBRARY SPACE ALLOCATIONS

Collections Space
1,196
3,000
+ 1,804

Adult Collections
546
750
+ 204

Adult Reading Area
-150
+ 150

Young Adult Collections
112
200
+ 88

Young Adult Reading Area
100
150
+ 50

Study Rooms
60
125
+ 65

Group Worktable Area
136
150
+ 14

New Releases Area
12
50
+ 38

Periodicals
36
50
+ 14

Electronic Media Collections
48
75
+ 27

Children’s Collection
146
750
+ 604

Teen Computer Stations
-40
+ 40

Children Computer Stations
-50
+ 50

Children’s Reading & Storytime Area
-400
+ 400

Patron Unisex Restroom
-60
+ 60

Meeting & Classroom Space
169
3,875
+ 3,706

Computer Classroom / Business Center
169
300
+ 131

Multi-Purpose Room – 2 dividers
-3,000
+ 3,000

Storage: table/chairs
-250
+ 250

Warming Kitchen
-250
+ 250

Kitchen Storage
-75
+ 75

Administration Space
190
1,255
+ 1,065

Circulation Desk
56
175
+ 119

Staff Offices
56
300
+ 244

Staff Workroom
-180
+ 180

Staff Break Area
-100
+ 100

Staff Restroom
-50
+ 50

Temporary Holding/Storage
-150
+ 150

General Storage
78
300
+ 222

Supreme Court Library Space
-300
+ 300

Supreme Court Library Center
-200
+ 200

Consultation Room
-75
+ 75

Storage
-25
+ 25

Chamber of Commerce Visitor Center Space
-200
+ 200

Visitor Center
-175
+ 175

Storage
-25
+ 25

Building Support Space
47
850
+ 803

Lobby
12
200
+ 188

Restrooms
35
400
+ 365

Outdoor Storage – Library
-150
+ 150

Custodial
-100
+ 100

LIBRARY SUBTOTAL (NET AREA)
1,602
9,480
+ 7,878

Mechanical/Walls/Circulation
436
2,370

Building Footprint Total Area (Gross Area)
2,038
11,850

Net to Gross Ratio
78.61%
80.00%

Comments:
a
In existing library, the reading area is shared
b
Existing study areas are not private
c
Existing staff work areas are part of cirulation desk
d
Existing library has only one uni-sex toilet

32. What percentage of the revenues come from Agricultural properties?
Breakdown of types of property tax that make up Library District revenues (AV= Assessed Value)
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